Art Archives | Hawaii's First Coworking Space
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Arts and Culture: Lauren Trangmar

Lauren Trangmar is an artist with a focus in design work. Lauren feels working in design gives her the opportunity to work in a multitude of mediums such as drawing, painting, and printmaking. She creates fine-line illustrations influenced by the line work of 17th century European cartographic illustrations. Being a designer who can work with a diverse set of mediums gives her the opportunity to display her pieces in both the fine art and commercial art worlds.

Was there a pivotal moment when you decided to follow your passion for art? 


I’ve always wanted to be an artist. At a young age my parents supported my dream but they told me I wouldn’t make any money as an artist. When I started college I really wanted to pursue a painting major. My friends told me that I should go into graphic design because it was one path where I could make a living while making art while continuing to paint on the side. One of my design instructors told me “well you can paint in my class, you can draw in my class, you can do a film, and use it in your design.” I thought to myself that if I can do everything in this design class, then I’m going to do it.  Being able to work in different mediums felt like a super power as Iʻm able to mesh both my art and design skills together. Existing in both the design and art world also gave me the ability to market my pieces to both audiences. For the 2015 Artists of Hawaii Show, I did a series of illustrations and the Museum bought the original illustrations and put it in the archives. Then, I made print copies of my original illustrations in a big quantity and sell in different shops like Fishcake

How do you market yourself as an artist or a graphic designer?


I make most of my connections through word of mouth. I have been really lucky. People come to me for my distinct style. I’ve also gotten a lot of work from the Artists of Hawaii show. The owner of Aloha Green Apothecary saw my work at the museum and asked me to jump on their project. With Aloha Green Apothecary, I was creating various illustrations to represent different strains of cannabis. It’s really interesting because I didn’t know a lot about cannabis at all. I had to do months of research about cannabis. I went through all the crazy names of the different strands and then imagined what I could to do to visually interpret them.

I make most of my connections through word of mouth. I have been really lucky. People come to me for my distinct style. I’ve also gotten a lot of work from the Artists of Hawaii show. The owner of Aloha Green Apothecary saw my work at the museum and asked me to jump on their project. With Aloha Green Apothecary, I was creating various illustrations to represent different strains of cannabis. It’s really interesting because I didn’t know a lot about cannabis at all. I had to do months of research about cannabis. I went through all the crazy names of the different strands and then imagined what I could to do to visually interpret them.

How does the materials you work with inform your work?


I’ll often scan my drawings into the computer a work things out digitally, then I’ll print the new image and print on top of the digital illustration. It’s a back and forth process between illustration, digital work, and printmaking. I tend to do this process with a lot of my projects. 

I do this a lot when I’m illustrating for Flux magazine . I would first draw and paint with watercolor on tracing paper so I could see through it and then I would stack the layers up and I would scan each one into photoshop. In photoshop I can play around with it a bit more to  figure out how it’s going to look.

What is your work flow for doing art and how do you project manage?


When I start a freelance project I tend to intensely sketch out ideas for weeks. Once I have an idea, I go into the production phase and follow up with regular clients meetings. There are lots of up and down times depending on what stage I’m in with my projects. For example, last week I barely left my studio. However, this week I’m taking meetings and installing work. I make sure to meet my deadlines. Usually, the work I do for magazines like Flux, they want it in a week or two so I’ll Intensively work on those. While I work on projects with short deadlines, I’ll also take on a bigger project that will take months. For example, the Aloha Green Apothecary project has been ongoing for about a year now. That being said, I often like to take breaks from the longer projects to focus on shorter projects.

Do you have a favorite book, film or artist, which inspires you?


A lot of my work is influenced by 17th century cartographer Andrea Cellarius. Andrea Cellarius creates these crazy star maps filled with detailed drawings of mythical creatures and planets. I’m constantly looking at his work. I went to the library and I got to look at a massive book full of his print ads. You’ll see his influence in the work I made at the museum.

What does it mean to be an artist in Hawaii?


Wherever you are, the people and experiences you’re exposed to are going to inform your work. I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work with Aloha Green Apothecary or have my work in Fishcake. Also, the teachers at UH gave me the freedom the explore different mediums within my design practice.   

Have you ever doubted your art practice?


l doubt my practice all the time. I’m friends with people who are at all different levels in their careers. They all share their doubts and struggles with me and this has helped me get over my own fears.. I learned that doubt is something that never goes away no matter what stage you are in your career. You have to figure it out, keep going and learn from your mistakes.

What advice would you give to an aspiring artist?


Don’t give up. Just embrace the fear and do it anyway. I’m scared all the time. I have projects and I tell clients “yeah sure I’ll do it.” Then I go back to a blank piece of paper and I think to myself, “how am I gonna do that?” Sometimes when you’re working for a client, the hardest part of your job is reading their mind and bringing it out onto the page. I feel like I have to turn into a mind reader, I never know if i’m going to get it right. So I’m always a bit nervous, but I just keep working for it.

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Atis Puampai

Photograph by Kent Nishimura (kentnishimura.com)

 

Artist Atis Puampai is focused on observing perceptions of time through the lens of his modified cameras. By taking pictures that display the motion of the earth moving around the sun, Atis uses photography to observe the way humans experience time.  He also takes photos of his surroundings during his daily journey from home to work to focus on the banality of time. Instead of using digital cameras or computer programs to edit his photos, Atis constructs film cameras from recycled camera parts to create his desired effects. His personal philosophy towards his practice is to use any resources you have to observe everything around you. In this vein, Atis taught himself photography by using his friendʻs old camera and learned photo techniques through trial and error. Though Atis has been mostly self-taught, he recently received his Masters in Fine Art (MFA) from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The MFA program gave Atis a better understanding on how to fully conceptualize his artworks. I asked Atis to sit down with me in the BoxJellyʻs conference room to further discuss his art practice.

Was there a pivotal moment when you decided to follow your passion for art?

Atis: After I graduated from high school one of my friends gave me my first camera and I immediately got hooked. I just kept taking pictures of my buddies, skate friends, and anything in general. I was the typical shutterbug. During that time I took rolls and rolls of film. Everything I know about photography is from trial and error. All the worst things that can happen when you pick up photography happened to me. For instance, I used to load film incorrectly into my camera to the point that I wasn’t able to wind my camera. I had to learn to deal with different light sources without a light meter. I ruined a lot of photos discovering the difference between sunlight and sunlight on a cloudy day. I tend to learn things better when I make mistakes. I also learned a lot from my friends who were photographers. I would show them my photos and they would tell me what was wrong and how to fix them. .

 

How does the materials you work with inform your art practice?

Atis: Going through the MFA program at UH really taught me to be critical on my thoughts towards photography and my process for creating photos. For example, when people take pictures they say “Iʻm going to shoot a photo.” I remember my old photography professor would say “Its not shooting photos, you’re not capturing the images. You’re making pictures by collecting information around you.” So the whole idea of photography for me is about observation and collection. My artistic vision comes second to the observation. Also, I’m always trying to figure out how I can keep things simple and work with materials I already have. I create photos from cameras that I craft from salvaged camera equipment. One comment I got when someone saw my modified cameras was “Itʻs like seeing a caveman discover photography for the first time.” I took that comment and thought, how do I move through the history of photography using  my intuition? I make my cameras and “discover” various camera effects and craft my camera to achieve desired effects. In the act of making I often wonder do I need a shutter or other basic functions to bring my ideas into reality.

 

What ideas are you exploring with your art?

Atis: Iʻm exploring different perceptions of time. For my project titled “Earth at 970 mph” I took photos of the sun to show the earth in motion in relation to the sun. The sun is something that is constant and anybody can locate. We watch it rise and fall everyday. However, we rarely think about the motion and the rate we are moving around the sun. As the sun stays the same, we humans are moving and evolving. This calls into question our human significance. I took these photos at Mauna Kea. Mauna Kea is monumental and a specific location. Iʻm also trying to find the magic of being at Mauna Kea in my everyday routine. I take photos of my route from home to work. By taking pictures of my daily route, Iʻm also exploring the mundaneness of time.

What is your work flow for doing art and how do you project manage

Atis: My workflow is sporadic. I go on these spurts where I work everyday. It’s like pringles. Once you start you can’t stop eating them but once your done you can go a long time without pringles. While working on a photo series I try to explore numerous ways to approach the concepts I’m interested in at the time. Once I feel like I have said everything I can about the concepts, that is when I known a photo series is completed.

What does it mean to be an artist in Hawaii?

Atis: Being an artist in Hawaii has made me very resourceful. Hawaii is in the middle of the ocean and has a very iconic location. Hawaii also has a strong connection to the themes of an idyllic paradise and tourism. As an artist I take it as a challenge to create photographs in Hawaii with concepts that can be applied anywhere.

 

Is there a piece you would like to be known for?

Atis: I would like to be known for my concept of exploring different perceptions of time and my modified cameras. My thesis series “Project: ANCIENT LIGHT” focuses on the fact that the light coming from the sun is 10,000 to 100,000 years old. The light that the earth receives now is older then all of written human history. With “Project: ANCIENT LIGHT” I’m exploring time past our human experience.

Do you have a favorite book, film or artist, which inspires you?

Atis: Artist Hiroshi Sugimoto is a big inspiration. He’s a photographer and he also explores the themes of time and space. His work is super polished.  I see him as a foil as I work the other way; really rough and raw. Stylistically, my photographs are inspired by Sugimoto. Sugimoto lets the concepts of the work take over so what visually comes out is purely the concept.

Have you ever doubted your art practice?

Atis: I have always doubted my art practice. I believe there will always be doubt. Anyone who is a creative, musician, or artist will doubt their practice at some point. I feel like I’ve done my best work when I felt the most doubtful. If your so sure of the work you create it might be too formulaic. If I doubt my work but I’m honest with it, I think people will be able to at least resonate with what I create.

What advice would you give to an inspiring artist?

Atis: Get ready to struggle, but as artists we will struggle together.

Check at more of Atis Puampaiʻs artwork at http://www.atispuampai.com

 

06/023/2017.  Seven second exposure. Elapsed time: 0 min.

30″x40″. Archival Pigment Print from Fujifilm FP-100C Instant Picture.

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Josh Smith – Already There

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Supernatural FX Showreel

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Oscar Wilde Yellow Sunset

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Madrid’s photo marathon

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John Veen Famous Musician

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Josh – Already There Remix

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Bow Wow Meow Pet Pop-up @ Fishcake

Happy Aloha Friday Jelly’s!

There’s a great event for you and your pets happening tomorrow Saturday June 29th at Fishcake, right next door to BoxJelly. It’s being put on by Art & Flea and Fishcake. BoxJelly member Rex Maximilian will be set up to take portraits of you and your pets! Everyone is invited!
BOWWowMeow

Art & Flea and Fishcake Present: Bow Wow Meow

Date: Sat June 29th

Time: 12p-4p

Place: Fishcake – 3087-c Kamani St (next door to BoxJelly)

FREE

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Revenant Young Architects Exhibit

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Revenant Young Architects Exhibit @ BoxJelly

Date: June 3-July 10, 2013.

XMANIFOLD A.D.R.L.(Applied Design Research Laboratory), presents REVENANT: The Undeath of Ideas In Architecture. This exhibition features ambitious, architectural concepts from young architects around the world. With awe inspiring visuals and bold new concepts, these paradigm shifting visions of architectural innovation invoke both emotion and inspiration. The exhibition’s goal is to critically examine and protest the trend toward the lost and marginalization of bold, vanguard, and utopian proposals in contemporary architectural discourse, particularly in architectural practice and architectural education. Spotlighted in an article by Honolulu Weekly, this exhibit shows a rare glimpse into local architect Dimitri Kim ‘s vision of what contemporary buildings could be. Take advantage of this viewing opportunity at BoxJelly, Hawaii’s first and largest co-working space.

For More information on XMANIFOLD A.D.R.L.(Applied Design Research Laboratory), visit XMANIFOLD.COM 

More of the Gallery:

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Eidolon- Chao-Wei Su

 
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Eiodolon- Chao-Wei Su

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Back: Quantum Polis- Herman Lee, Front: Excavating Utopia- Matthew Hung

 
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Allegory of Tank- Dimitri Daniel Kim

Read more about the article

Honolulu Weekly

 

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